• Home
  • Science
  • Science News
  • Google's AI Firm DeepMind Helps Mathematicians Develop New Theorem in Potential Breakthrough

Google's AI Firm DeepMind Helps Mathematicians Develop New Theorem in Potential Breakthrough

The researchers used DeepMind's AI to discover a surprising connection between algebraic and geometric invariant knots.

Google's AI Firm DeepMind Helps Mathematicians Develop New Theorem in Potential Breakthrough

Photo Credit: DeepMind

Researchers said they were surprised to see how ML helped them with pure mathematics

Highlights
  • DeepMind has been able to handle problems that need lot of data analysis
  • Once algorithm zeroed in on a pattern, it guessed very precisely
  • Researchers were "shocked" at the accuracy

Scientists have developed a new mathematical theorem using artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. This finding has revealed for the first time that artificial intelligence can assist in pure mathematics. Mathematicians from the universities of Oxford and Sydney teamed up with DeepMind, a Google-owned company based in London, to investigate knot theory and representation theory. Both of these are considered pure mathematics and rely heavily on human intuition for progress. DeepMind was able to find patterns and relationships in the two sophisticated mathematical domains, according to the researchers in a recent report.

DeepMind has been able to handle problems that necessitate a massive quantity of data analysis. But these researchers used the AI to discover a surprising connection between algebraic and geometric invariant knots, establishing a completely new theorem in the field.

“I was very struck at just how useful the machine-learning tools could be as a guide for intuition,” Marc Lackenby at the University of Oxford, one of the mathematicians who took part in the study published, told the journal Nature, adding, “I was not expecting to have some of my preconceptions turned on their head.”

The researchers said they were surprised to see how machine learning helped them develop new connections between different areas of mathematics. Professor Geordie Williamson and his colleagues at the University of Sydney used the connections to bring them closer to proving a conjecture that has been unsolved for 40 years. Whether the conjecture will prove true is still an open question. But, he added, “I was just blown away by how powerful this stuff is.”

Once the algorithm zeroed in on a pattern, it was able to guess very precisely. “How quickly the models were getting accuracy — that for me was just shocking,” Williamson said. “I think I spent basically a year in the darkness just feeling the computers knew something that I didn't.”

About the potential breakthrough, DeepMind said in a blogpost that the use of learning techniques and AI systems holds great promise for identifying and discovering patterns in mathematics.


Will Snapdragon's new 2022 chips make it more prominent as a brand? We discuss this on Orbital, the Gadgets 360 podcast. Orbital is available on Spotify, Gaana, JioSaavn, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music and wherever you get your podcasts.
Comments

For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and Google News. For the latest videos on gadgets and tech, subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Google Delays Mandatory Return to Office Beyond January 10
US Federal Trade Commission Sues to Block Nvidia-Arm Deal

Related Stories

Share on Facebook Tweet Snapchat Share Reddit Comment
 
 

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

© Copyright Red Pixels Ventures Limited 2022. All rights reserved.
Listen to the latest songs, only on JioSaavn.com