TweetDeck Now Allows Users to Embed Multiple Photos in Tweets

Share on Facebook Tweet Share Reddit Comment
TweetDeck Now Allows Users to Embed Multiple Photos in Tweets
TweetDeck, a social media dashboard app for managing one or more Twitter accounts, is now allowing users to embed or attach multiple photos in a tweet - a feature that was introduced by Twitter earlier this year.

First reported by The Next Web, the new feature is now available in TweetDeck's Android app, Windows desktop app, and the Web interface. Apple Mac users should get this feature soon as well, speculates the report.

Notably, Twitter had rolled out the ability to attach multiple multiple photos in a tweet via its iOS app in March, and then later added to Web interface and the Android app in May.

The feature allows users to share up to four photos in a single tweet, and the photos are stitched together into a collage. Once users share multiple (up to four) photos in a tweet, a collage is automatically created.

In May, TweetDeck had added emoji support. On its official Twitter handle, the company wrote that emoji support (brought to the Web by Twitter in April) will be available for the Chrome extensions and the Windows app.

"From today you'll find some special little characters in your columns! Emojis are now supported on web, Windows and Chrome Extension," read TweetDeck's tweet.

Twitter had introduced emoji support in April, seeking popularity of the emoticons. Along with Twitter mobile interface, the company had updated its Web interface as well. Previously, the tweeted emoji images from the mobile apps (Android and iOS) use to appear as hollow boxes on the web.
Comments

For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Further reading: Apps, Social, TweetDeck, Twitter
Prime Minister Narendra Modi Makes His Debut on Instagram
App Deals of the Week: Save Over Rs. 14,000
 
 

Advertisement

 

Advertisement

© Copyright Red Pixels Ventures Limited 2019. All rights reserved.